Latest Labour News

More Canadian musicians adding their voice in support of the “CARE NOT PROFITS” advocacy campaign to reinvest profits back into Ontario’s long-term care system

Unifor -

Chantal Kreviazuk, The Sheepdogs, Basia Bulat, Born Ruffians, and Tokyo Police Club latest to support the growing campaign to reform Ontario’s long-term care system

August 4, 2020

TORONTO — SEIU Healthcare, CUPE Ontario, and Unifor, unions that represent healthcare workers across the long-term care sector, are proud to welcome Chantal Kreviazuk, The Sheepdogs, Basia Bulat, Born Ruffians, and Tokyo Police Club as the latest Canadian musicians to add their voice to our growing “Care Not Profits” campaign to reform Ontario’s long-term care system.

“Care Not Profits” is an invitation to everyone in our province to call on Premier Ford to end the failed experiment of for-profit long-term care delivery. Our deepest appreciation goes out to these amazingly talented artists for using their voices for good, along with Sarah Harmer who last week performed a “Care Not Profits” Facebook Live session for over 25,000 viewers in support of long-term care reform, which can be streamed here.

QUOTES:

“The time for action to reform our long-term care system is now. Workers know it. Families know it. And these proud Canadian musicians know it. We can no longer accept anti-care policies that cater to the profits of a few major nursing home corporations. Even as residents and workers were dying during the pandemic, companies like Chartwell, Extendicare, and Sienna continued to pay shareholders millions of dollars in dividends. Premier Ford must act now to give healthcare workers the support they need to deliver quality care for our most vulnerable. That means full-time jobs with higher wages, increased staffing levels, and the end to tax-payer funded for-profit long-term care.” – Sharleen Stewart, President, SEIU Healthcare

“This pandemic has only exposed and deepened an existing crisis in long-term care. And one thing it revealed is that the for-profit homes were the most dangerous sites for our elders. We need to do better – we need a complete overhaul of the system so that this never happens again. That’s why I’m so happy to see that the message is spreading and that more artists are joining us in this effort. Together, we will end for-profit care and create a system that our elders deserve.” – Candace Rennick, Secretary-Treasurer, CUPE Ontario

“Music has a way of touching our souls. We hope the contributions of these talented Canadian artists and the growing chorus of concerned citizens demanding Care Not Profits can move the hearts and minds of Premier Ford and his team to finally make concrete change to Ontario’s long-suffering long-term care system. We can’t wait any longer for government to end for-profit care and fund dignified living conditions for our most vulnerable while respecting the people who dutifully care for them.” – Jerry Dias, National President, Unifor

BACKGROUND ON THE “CARE NOT PROFITS” CAMPAIGN:

During the COVID-19 crisis, Ontario’s worst hit nursing homes were all for-profit facilities. Data tells us that for-profit long-term care corporations have 17 per cent fewer staff than non-profit nursing homes. Yet, while families and care staff were dying throughout the pandemic, three of the largest long-term care businesses combined paid shareholders more than $58 million in dividends in the past three months alone. These are facts.

The new, 60-second ad called “Care Not Profits” originally launched on July 23rd.

To view the ad and learn more, visit carenotprofits.ca

The full, high-definition broadcast from this morning’s campaign launch, including the 60-second ad, is available for media to download here: https://bit.ly/39lxVfU

For media inquiries, contact:

 

Corey Johnson

SEIU Healthcare

c.johnson@seiuhealthcare.ca

416-529-8909



Daniel Tseghay

CUPE Communications

dtseghay@cupe.ca

647-220-9739



Shelley Amyotte

Unifor Communications

shelley.amyotte@unifor.org

902-717-7491

 

 

WE, the United Way, and labour’s charity problem

Rank and File - latest news -

By Doug Nesbitt “André Ouellet, Canada’s [Liberal] foreign affairs minister, threw human rights out of the whole issue of trade,” He [Craig Kielburger] told the delegates indignantly. “He said that Canada isn’t the world’s Boy Scout.” (Laughter. Meaningful pause). “Well, I’m a Boy Scout-” (Prolonged surge of laughter and applause). “And this just means that Continue readingWE, the United Way, and labour’s charity problem

Strike averted as Dominion store workers reach tentative agreement

Unifor -

July 31, 2020

ST. JOHN’S–Unifor Local 597 and Loblaw Companies Limited have reached a tentative collective agreement, avoiding strike action at Dominion stores across Newfoundland.

“These members have shown their character on the frontline of the pandemic and throughout the bargaining process as they united to improve working standards,” said Unifor National President Jerry Dias. “Unifor has and will continue the fight to raise the bar for essential retail workers.”

Details of the collective agreement will not be released prior to ratification. Member votes on the new contract will take place in the coming days.

"I want to thank the bargaining committee for their hard work and the public for showing their support for the workers," said Unifor Local 597 President Carolyn Wrice. "Our members look forward to continuing to play a vital role in their communities."

Unifor is Canada's largest union in the private sector and represents 315,000 workers in every major area of the economy. The union advocates for all working people and their rights, fights for equality and social justice in Canada and abroad, and strives to create progressive change for a better future.

For media inquiries please contact Unifor Communications Representative Kathleen O’Keefe at kathleen.okeefe@unifor.org or 416-896-3303 (cell).

“Enough talk. We need bold action now.”: a coalition of unions representing front-line healthcare workers respond to Ontario’s long-term care staffing study

Unifor -

July 30, 2020

TORONTO — Unions that represent front-line healthcare workers across the long-term care sector issued the below joint statement following the release of Ontario’s long-term care staffing study, attributed to Sharleen Stewart, President, SEIU Healthcare, Candace Rennick, Secretary-Treasurer, CUPE Ontario, and Jerry Dias, National President, Unifor:

“Today the provincial government received yet another recommendations report on what we’ve already known for years. It’s time for transformational funding commitments and rigorous implementation timelines to ensure healthcare workers receive the support they need to deliver quality care for our most vulnerable. Unfortunately, Premier Ford’s government has yet to take steps towards funding an action plan to improve the delivery of long-term care. All three unions have long been advocating for a legislated care standard of four hours per resident per day and are urging the government to take immediate steps to pass that into law.

We are pleased that the report echoes our recommendation for a minimum daily average of four hours of direct care per resident, based on hours worked, not hours paid. The next step is ensuring that this has teeth by becoming legislated.

There are constructive, actionable steps that Premier Ford should take now to improve the system:

  1. Ensure that workers are paid at a rate commensurate with their significant contributions
  2. Eliminate Bill 124’s adverse impacts on worker retention
  3. Reverse the previously eliminated paid sick leave
  4. Revise transfer payment agreements with operators to mandate more full-time jobs
  5. Include unions, families and worker advocates in all policy implementation tables

Front-line healthcare workers are real heroes who have for too-long been exploited by a system that puts profits before care. They need support now, before the fall flu season and before a subsequent spike in COVID-19.

As we all know, long-term care staffing was in crisis prior to the spread of COVID-19, but it’s now on life support after the crushing impacts of the pandemic. Enough talk. We need bold action now.”

For media inquiries, contact:



Corey Johnson

SEIU Healthcare

c.johnson@seiuhealthcare.ca

416-529-8909



Daniel Tseghay

CUPE Communications

dtseghay@cupe.ca

647-220-9739



Shelley Amyotte

Unifor Communications

shelley.amyotte@unifor.org

902-717-7491

 

Enough talk, we need bold action on long-term care now: unions

Unifor -

“Enough talk. We need bold action now.”: a coalition of unions representing front-line healthcare workers respond to Ontario’s long-term care staffing study

TORONTO — Unions that represent front-line healthcare workers across the long-term care sector issued the below joint statement following the release of Ontario’s long-term care staffing study, attributed to Sharleen Stewart, President, SEIU Healthcare, Candace Rennick, Secretary-Treasurer, CUPE Ontario, and Jerry Dias, National President, Unifor:

“Today the provincial government received yet another recommendations report on what we’ve already known for years. It’s time for transformational funding commitments and rigorous implementation timelines to ensure healthcare workers receive the support they need to deliver quality care for our most vulnerable. Unfortunately, Premier Ford’s government has yet to take steps towards funding an action plan to improve the delivery of long-term care. All three unions have long been advocating for a legislated care standard of four hours per resident per day and are urging the government to take immediate steps to pass that into law.

We are pleased that the report echoes our recommendation for a minimum daily average of four hours of direct care per resident, based on hours worked, not hours paid. The next step is ensuring that this has teeth by becoming legislated.

There are constructive, actionable steps that Premier Ford should take now to improve the system:
1. Ensure that workers are paid at a rate commensurate with their significant contributions
2. Eliminate Bill 124’s adverse impacts on worker retention
3. Reverse the previously eliminated paid sick leave
4. Revise transfer payment agreements with operators to mandate more full-time jobs
5. Include unions, families and worker advocates in all policy implementation tables

Front-line healthcare workers are real heroes who have for too-long been exploited by a system that puts profits before care. They need support now, before the fall flu season and before a subsequent spike in COVID-19.

As we all know, long-term care staffing was in crisis prior to the spread of COVID-19, but it’s now on life support after the crushing impacts of the pandemic. Enough talk. We need bold action now.”

For media inquiries, contact:

Corey Johnson
SEIU Healthcare
c.johnson@seiuhealthcare.ca
416-529-8909

Daniel Tseghay
CUPE Communications
dtseghay@cupe.ca
647-220-9739

Shelley Amyotte
Unifor Communications
shelley.amyotte@unifor.org
902-717-7491

Dominion store strike deadline looms

Unifor -

July 30, 2020

ST. JOHN’S–Negotiations to renew the collective agreement between Unifor and Loblaw Companies Limited are coming down to the wire as a strike deadline that will affect all 11 Dominion stores in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador looms.

“This is not the outcome we want. However, as the hours pass it becomes clearer that strike action may be inevitable,” said Unifor National President Jerry Dias.

Negotiations between Unifor and Loblaw have been ongoing for eight months, beginning shortly after the company’s decision to eliminate 60 full-time positions, approximately 1 in 5 full-time jobs, at Newfoundland Dominion locations. Today more than 80 % of the remaining workers are part-time, with more than half earning less than $12 an hour.

“At this point some progress has been made. However, on the most important matters, including wages and new full-time jobs, we remain far apart. We are nearing an impasse,” said Unifor Local 597 President Carolyn Wrice.

The approximately 1,400 frontline workers at the Dominion stores have been working without a contract since October 2019 and have not received a wage increase since the spring of 2018.

“The COVID-19 crisis has been very difficult on our members, physically and emotionally. The only positive aspect was that it reminded Canadians of the value of supermarket work,” said Dias. “These frontline workers put their health and safety on the line to keep stores open and food on tables. Million-dollar Loblaw executives didn’t do that. The workers did.”

Unifor is Canada's largest union in the private sector and represents 315,000 workers in every major area of the economy. The union advocates for all working people and their rights, fights for equality and social justice in Canada and abroad, and strives to create progressive change for a better future.

For media inquiries please contact Unifor Communications Representative Kathleen O’Keefe at kathleen.okeefe@unifor.org or 416-896-3303 (cell).

 

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